Michael A. Black – Returns with Devil’s Advocate

My Trackdown Series Continues

You’ll recall that old saying, a rolling stone gathers no moss. Well, last year was indeed a busy one for me. With the COVID-19 virus confusion canceling the college classes that I teach, as well as the PSWA Conference for which I’m the program director, I found myself with more time to write. I managed to produce five novels and a couple of short stories. One of the novels was a western, which I wrote under my A.W. Hart pseudonym (Gunslinger: Killer’s Ghost), but the other four were under my own name and introduced a whole new series that I’m very excited about.

The first novel in my new Trackdown series, Devil’s Dance, debuted on November 15th from Wolfpack publishing. It begins the saga about former Army Ranger, Steve Wolf, who’s wrongly convicted of a war crime in the waning days of the Iraq war. Unbeknownst to Wolf, he is actually caught up in an elaborate scheme perpetrated by a very rich and eccentric man who will stop at nothing to obtain an ancient artifact stolen from the Iraqi National Museum of Art. Upon his release from a four-year prison term, Wolf is approached by his mentor, ex-green beret Jim McNamara, who convinces Wolf to join him in the business of Bail Bond Enforcement.

“Bail Bound Enforcement?” Wolf asks. “What’s that?”

“Bounty hunting,” McNamara replies. “Twenty-first Century style.” And so their picaresque adventures begins.

Based in Phoenix, Arizona, where McNamara and his daughter operate Trackdown, Incorporated out of their house in Phoenix, Arizona, Wolf reluctantly agrees to join Mac. The pair cross paths with some undesirable characters as they head down south of the border to apprehend a wanted fugitive. Unbeknownst to Wolf, his old enemies from Iraq, a PMC called the Vipers are also in Mexico on the trail of the same fugitive, who is in possession of the priceless stolen artifact being sought by the very rich and unscrupulous man. The trail leads them all to El Meco, the abandoned Mayan ruins. Wolf finds himself suddenly battling alone against a small army of vicious foes in a conflict where the only outcome is either survival or death.

Trackdown #2, Devil’s Fancy, came out on December 15th and continued the saga of Wolf and McNamara as they try to fit the pieces of this developing puzzle together and suddenly find themselves in the crosshairs of a highly professional and extremely deadly squad of mercenaries who give no quarter. Dodging more bullets than he did in a combat zone, Wolf must overcome the stacked odds against him if he is to survive this deadly endgame.

Next up was Trackdown #3, Devil’s Brigade, which was released on January 15th. This one finds our heroes being badgered by the FBI over the incident that occurred in Mexico, as well as a shootout involving federal agents in Devil’s Fancy. A lucrative bounty takes Wolf and Mac to a lawless encampment inside a large city in the Pacific Northwest. However, the same powerful, rich man who set Wolf up years ago is still shadowing him, hoping to gain possession of a priceless artifact that is now in Wolf’s unknowing possession. To accomplish this end, the sinister rich man employs another professional killer. A former CIA fixer who is set to come at Wolf with unrelenting efficiency. Just when it seems things couldn’t get worse, Wolf and McNamara must unexpectedly rescue Mac’s grandson, who has been taken to a militia compound and held hostage. Facing CIA killers, crazed militia forces, and overwhelming odds, Wolf once again finds himself outnumbered and outgunned in a brutal showdown where a young child’s life hangs in the balance.

These three lead to a finale of sorts in Trackdown #4, Devil’s Advocate, which came out on February 15th. When a possible path for Wolf to clear his name materializes, he jumps at the chance. However, he’s still being stalked by the shadow-like foes who are being funded by the same rich sociopath who set Wolf up for the false charges back in Iraq. Wolf and McNamara find themselves facing a brutal gang of ruthless bikers as well as the group of highly proficient CIA-trained killers. This time their quest ultimately takes them to Belize, where they discover an ultimate betrayal and finally come face-to-face with the man behind it all. With the odds stacked against him once again, Wolf finds himself in a desperate struggle to save an innocent life, but will it cost him his last chance at redemption? You’ll have to wait until February to find out.

So, as you can see, it was a rather hectic and busy year. And what, you may ask, is ahead at 2021?

Right now, I’m not sure if the Trackdown series will continue. Like any new venture, a lot will depend on the sales. Like the first season of a new TV series, the four books described above do offer completion of the original story arc. Or do they? I’m being a bit coy about this because I am awaiting a contract for a fifth book in the series as I write this, and have an idea about how I’d like the saga of Steve Wolf to continue. I’ve also been contacted about finishing off the Gunslinger series under the A.W. Hart moniker and have three new short stories set to come out in various magazines. And then, of course, I’m hopeful that once this COVID-19 thing is firmly in our rearview mirrors, we’ll be able to move ahead with the PSWA Conference in July.

Another milestone for me was being inducted into the Illinois Martial Arts Hall of Fame. Although the virus KOed the pageantry of being presented with the plaque at the formal dinner, it was presented to me at one of the limited, socially distanced book signings I was able to host in November. Through all of last year’s ups and downs, I tried to remain positive and continued to be thankful for all my good friends, one of whom is George Cramer, who once again invited me to be on his blog. Thanks, George, and let’s all look forward to doing a lot of writing in the coming year. Thanks for tuning in.

 

Stay safe,

Michael A. Black

8 Comments

  1. Madeline Gornell

    I can’t comprehend how you do it, Mike! You are amazing–5! You are an inspiration…write on, Mike!

    Reply
  2. John Schembra

    You are amazing, Mike. I’ve read the first of your Trackdown books and really enjoyed it! I’ll be ordering more of the series. You write excellent action books, with believable characters and great plots. keep ‘Em coming!,

    Reply
  3. Michael A. Black

    Thanks for stopping by, Vicki. I’ve enjoyed your work as well. Good luck

    Reply
  4. Michael A. Black

    Marilyn and Joe, two of the stalwarts of the PSWA- Thanks for stopping by. I appreciate your support. We have a board meeting (virtual) coming up soon to discuss our plans. unfortunately, a lot of the planning is dependent upon what restrictions will be in place and how many people will want to travel and attend. I’m optimistic that we’ll be able to have our conference so keep your fingers crossed and only uncrossed them to write. 😉
    George, thanks again for the opportunity to share the news about my latest books. You’re the man.

    Reply
    • George Cramer

      Mike,
      You and your work are always welcome here. I second or third, the folks, you are an amazing writer.
      Take Care & Stay Safe

      Reply
  5. Joseph HAGGERTY

    Damn Mike, you write faster than I read. I’ve read two of the Gunslinger books and now I’ve got to get this Trackdown series. I love your writing and will continue being a fan. I’ve also read two of the executioner’s books as well. When is the board meeting to decide whether we will have a conference this year?

    Reply
  6. Vicki Weisfeld

    Wow! What an ambitious writing schedule. It’s great that you share all those exciting stories! Hope the series is a big hit.

    Reply
  7. Marilyn Meredith

    You are amazing, Mike! I can’t imagine writing as many books as you did in one year! I’ve read a lot of them, and believe me folks, no one writes more believable action adventure than he does. I’m partial to his westerns, but have enjoyed every book of his I’ve read. And I am hoping the PSWA conference is a go too. I miss seeing all my PSWA friends.

    Reply

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Susie Kearley – Debut Novelist and Freelance Writer, United Kingdom

 Pestilence – In a changing world,

Impacted by global warming, a strange new fungus grows in the damp, humid climate. People have discovered its mind-altering effects – and everyone’s using. Dr. David Leeman has discovered a medicinal use for this compound – a miracle cure, to end antibiotic resistance and treat incurable disease.

Terry is an early beneficiary of the wonder-drug. She’s taking part in clinical trials, but her partner, Alex, is furious. He’s bitterly opposed to the pharmaceutical industry and won’t support her. Little Jessica is developing a drug habit, using the new legal high – then she develops a skin problem.

Dr. Leeman realizes, too late, that his wonder-drug has created a pathway for a new pandemic – a fungal disease that is causing mass deaths across the globe.

As civilization collapses, the three come together, forming a healing commune to boost their immune systems and fight the pathogen. But will they find a cure?

I’ve always enjoyed apocalyptic thrillers, so perhaps it was natural that this would be the theme of my first novel.

‘Pestilence’ published in January 2021, is a pandemic story about a deadly fungus that brings about the end of the world. The idea came to me when I was 16 years old. I was a keen horror fan, inspired by James Herbert. But the story got shelved and wasn’t published for another 30 years, by which time it had evolved into a thriller, substantially changed and improved.

It was pure coincidence that the year I spent pitching the book to agents was the year a real pandemic happened! I’m hoping people will think this makes the book more topical and enhances its appeal!

In the day job, I’m a freelance writer, covering health, travel, and lifestyle topics for a wide range of magazines. I also have non-fiction books on WWII, travel, and freelance writing.

How I Became a Writer – I’d always wanted to be a professional writer, but I had to get a proper job while I lived with my parents and ended up trying to build a career in marketing. The opportunity to become a writer came when I was 36 years old and took voluntary redundancy. With support from my husband, I decided to try my luck at freelance writing, and I’m still doing it 11 years later, so I must have done something right. I write every day from the sunniest room in the house – it’s bright and cozy when the sun’s out. I work from 8 am to 5 pm, taking a break for lunch. I also go for a walk in the afternoons.

My Current Work in Progress – Today I’m writing an article about a cold war nuclear bunker for a general interest magazine. The British government’s preparations for nuclear war in the 1950s were startling, and it came as quite a shock when I first found out how close we’d come to possible nuclear annihilation. They had the leaflets printed for circulation to the public, telling people how to survive nuclear fallout, but they were never distributed because the immediate threat of nuclear war never came.

My Favourite Character in the Novel – In my fiction, the end of the world is caused by a fungal pathogen, not nuclear war! I enjoyed writing the bad guy scenes the most. My bad guy, Alex, is a complicated character with a passion for animal welfare but a tendency to lash out and become violent with people. He’s spent a lot of time in jail, and in the book, he ends up in situations that challenge his character, exposing both the good and the bad. I’d be interested to hear from readers, whether they empathize with him or think he’s a nasty piece of work.

My Favourite Writers – Since becoming a professional writer, I’ve tried to read more widely. I still like James Herbert, but I also like Peter James, Paula Hawkins, and I’m particularly fond of autobiographies and memoirs. My latest read is Without Conscience, a non-fiction book about psychopaths!

Advice for New Writers – My best advice for new writers is to persevere. Even if you take a break, you can always come back to writing when the time is right for you. I suspect I didn’t have what it takes to be a professional writer when I was 16, but I do now.

Also, if you’re struggling with a particular project (remember that book?), it can help to take a long break from your work, because then when you look at it afresh, you can see more clearly which parts are good and which parts need to be improved.

When I drafted Pestilence, I was a pantser. I had a list of ideas but didn’t plot the story well. If I write another novel, I will plan it carefully to save time and energy. Then there will be fewer edits required along the way!

Pestilence mybook.to/pestilencebook

Amazon Author page Author.to/SusieKearley

My blog www.susiekearley.blogspot.com

 

 

 

15 Comments

  1. Nancy Nau Sullivan

    Carl is the best. Haven’t read Dick Francis in years. Does his horseracing tack have influence on your writing? Thanks for sharing. Always interesting–influences!!

    Reply
  2. Mary

    Your comments on planning a novel or writing as a panster connected the hammer and the nail. I’m a panster. I’ve tried outlining but I lose interest in writing a book. You’ve encouraged me to try again. Thank you. Your book sounds exciting.

    Reply
    • Susie Kearley

      I’m so pleased my interview encouraged you to try again! Thanks for your feedback and good luck with your own writing project!

      Reply
  3. Margaret Mizushima

    Pestilence sounds like a fascinating read! Looking forward to it!

    Reply
    • Susie Kearley

      Thank you Margaret, I’m glad you like the sound of it. I really hope you enjoy reading. Would love to know what you think. 🙂

      Reply
  4. Thonie Hevron

    Thanks for this insightful interview. Your work sounds fascinating.

    Reply
    • Susie Kearley

      Thank you for reading and responding Thonie. Glad you enjoyed the interview. It was fun to take part! 🙂

      Reply
  5. Jackie

    Interesting story. Thanks for sharing. You’re right about plotting. I tried NaNoWriMo this year and it was a disaster. 🙂

    Reply
    • Susie Kearley

      Well at least you have something to work with. It’s easier to edit a draft than a blank page. Hope your NanoWriMo project is a massive success when it’s complete!

      Reply
  6. John G. Bluck

    Your book, “Pestilence,” sounds interesting. Are you thinking of writing a non-fiction book about Covid-19 and the unusual things that have happened to some people? There certainly must be many real incidents that are stranger than fiction.

    I look forward to checking out your novel. Cheers.

    Reply
    • Susie Kearley

      Hello John, I did wonder about that, but reckon it’s been so well documented, it’s probably been covered already. To be honest, I’m more in the mood for a modern take on a Dickensian tale now! Just need to figure out the details.

      Thank you for reading my interview and responding.

      Reply
  7. Michael A. Black

    Susan, it sounds like you’re following in the footsteps of one of my favorite (note the American spelling 😉 British authors, John Creasey. He wrote about 500 books under various names, but I always enjoyed his Dr. Palfrey series which always involved some kind of apocalyptic theme. Good luck with your writing and don’t let the fungus get yo down.

    Reply
    • Susie Kearley

      I’ve not come across the dr Palfrey series. I’ll look out for it. Sounds like something I might enjoy. Thanks for your good wishes and for reading my contribution.

      Reply
  8. Donnell Ann Bell

    Susan, thank you for being George’s guest today. I think you may be on to something regarding planning your next novel. I do both. I plan an overall storyline and arch, but leave some room for surprises. Best wishes.

    Reply
    • Susie Kearley

      That sounds like a really good approach. Thank you for reading and commenting Donnell. 🙂

      Reply

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Lois Winston – From Cozy to Caper

USA Today and Amazon bestselling and award-winning author Lois Winston writes mystery, romance, romantic suspense, chick lit, women’s fiction, children’s chapter books, and nonfiction under her own name and her Emma Carlyle pen name.

Kirkus Reviews dubbed her critically acclaimed Anastasia Pollack Crafting Mystery series, “North Jersey’s more mature answer to Stephanie Plum.” In addition, Lois is a former literary agent and an award-winning craft and needlework designer who often draws much of her source material for both her characters and plots from her experiences in the crafts industry.

When I first began writing years ago, I wrote romance and romantic suspense, but when the chick lit craze hit the publishing world, my agent suggested I try writing one. That’s when I discovered I had a knack for writing humor. Who knew? I flub every joke I’ve ever tried to tell!

The first book I ever sold straddled a line between women’s fiction and chick lit. Talk Gertie to Me was a humorous fish-out-of-water story about a mother and daughter. The second book I sold was Love, Lies and a Double Shot of Deception, the first book I ever wrote. But with only a few exceptions, my life since late 2009 has been consumed by Anastasia Pollack, the reluctant amateur sleuth of my Anastasia Pollack Crafting Mysteries. That’s when I signed a contract for the first three books in the series, which debuted in 2011.

One of those exceptions came about as a result of an invitation from Amazon. In 2015 they embarked on a new publishing venture. Kindle Worlds was a foray into fan fiction where anyone could write novellas that tied into handpicked existing series. To get the project up and running, Amazon invited additional authors, many recommended by the series authors, to create the first novellas.

There were few rules we had to follow in creating these companion novellas. Authors could use as little or as much of the existing series world as they wanted. We could even change the tone of the original books in the series.

I was asked to write a novella based on author CJ Lyons’ Shadow Ops Series. CJ writes what she calls “Thrillers with Heart.” Since writing the first of the Anastasia Pollack Crafting Mysteries, I’ve turned my back on the dark romantic suspense of my early books to concentrate on humorous tales. I figure there’s already too much in this world keeping us up at night. I want to give my readers an escape from the real world.

Since I had the freedom to create a novella in a different tone from the Shadow Ops books, I reimagined CJ’s domestic thriller series as a humorous caper. If you’re not familiar with capers, think Janet Evanovich’s Stephanie Plum series. Capers are a mashup of suspense or romantic suspense and humor. They’re often similar to amateur sleuth or cozy mysteries but without the restrictions regarding language, violence, or sex.

The Kindle Worlds program disbanded a few years later. The novella authors were allowed to republish their work as long as they received permission from the series author and all references to the original series were removed or changed.

I’m not the fastest writer, and Anastasia tends to keep me busy. I finally got around to updating my novella a few months ago after the release of A Sew Deadly Cruise, the ninth and latest Anastasia Pollack Crafting Mystery. However, I held off publishing the novella so it wouldn’t compete with the release of that book.

I changed the title of the novella from Mom Squad, expanding and rebranding it as Moms in Black, a Mom Squad Caper. If the novella does well, I plan to write two more Mom Squad Caper novellas for a 3-novella series, but right now, I’m hard at work on the tenth Anastasia Pollack Crafting Mystery.

Moms in Black – A Mom Squad Caper

When Cassandra Davenport applies for a job at www.savingtheworld.us, she expects to find a ‘green’ charity. Instead, she becomes the newest member of a covert organization run by ex-government officials. Dubbed the Mom Squad, the organization is the brainchild of three former college roommates—attorney general Anthony Granville, ex-FBI agent Gavin Demarco, and tech billionaire Liam Hatch—all of whom have lost loved ones at the hands of terrorists. Financed by Hatch, they work in the shadows and without the constraints of congressional oversight, reporting directly to Granville.

Demarco heads up one of the six groups that comprise the new operation. He hires Cassandra as the newest member of his New Jersey based team. In the course of monitoring possible terrorist threats, the Mom Squad discovers a link to Cassandra’s ex-husband. Before she’s fully trained, Cassandra is thrust into a world where her ex may be involved with radicalized terrorists bent on killing as many Americans as possible.

And while they’re saving the world from an imminent attack, what in the world will Cassandra do about all that sexual tension simmering between her and her new boss?

Buy Links (pre-order now; available 2/8/21)
Kindle https://amzn.to/2VZHTOcKobo https://www.kobo.com/us/en/ebook/moms-in-black
Nook https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/moms-in-black-lois-winston/1138442866?ean=2940162938507
Apple Books https://books.apple.com/us/book/moms-in-black/id1544138743
Paperback https://amzn.to/36Sgpjq

Contact Lois:

Website: www.loiswinston.com
Newsletter sign-up: https://app.mailerlite.com/webforms/landing/z1z1u5
Killer Crafts & Crafty Killers blog: www.anastasiapollack.blogspot.com
Pinterest: www.pinterest.com/anasleuth
Twitter: https://twitter.com/Anasleuth
Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/722763.Lois_Winston
Bookbub: https://www.bookbub.com/authors/lois-winston

15 Comments

  1. Donnell

    I have enjoyed every one of Lois’s books. Expect the unexpected when you read one. If you read something zany in the headlines, chances are you’re going to find something similar woven into Lois’s plots. Talented author!

    Reply
    • Lois Winston

      Thanks, Donnell! You know me so well!

      Reply
  2. Thonie Hevron

    This Mom Squad sounds like it’s right up my alley. I’m pre-ordering it right now!

    Reply
    • Lois Winston

      Thanks, Thonie! Hope you enjoy it.

      Reply
  3. Christiana Shields

    How are you marketing your Mom Squad novels? Are they considered mysteries, chicklit, cozies, etc? Is “caper” a term that can be used to identify a type of mystery? I ask because my novel doesn’t seem to fit any of the conventional definitions, and caper would be the closest!

    Reply
    • DONNARAE MENARD

      I write novella’s for stress relief. I pass copies out to my neighbors and some ask when the next installment is coming out. If you ever decide to do a blog on “Let have coffee a pub-novella.2gether. I’ll take my invitation straight with a cheese danish on the side.

      Reply
      • Lois Winston

        I’ll definitely keep that in mind, Donnarae!

        Reply
    • Lois Winston

      Hi Christina–
      Caper was a term I first came across when I started reading the Stephanie Plum books by Janet Evanovich, which were definitely outside the box of what you’d think of as amateur sleuth or cozy mysteries. They broke several of the standard conventions of those genres. As far as an “official” category, Amazon lists it as Women’s Adventure Fiction and Suspense Action Fiction, and I use Caper as one of my keywords.

      Reply
    • Lois Winston

      Thanks, Patricia! It was fun to write.

      Reply
  4. Michael A. Black

    I think you’re really on to something unique, Lois. Using humor in a thriller is a great idea. I hope the Mom’s Squad has a great run. Good luck.

    Reply
    • Lois Winston

      Thanks, Michael! I hope the writing gods agree with you! 😉

      Reply
  5. Caridad Pineiro

    Love your origin story, Lois. You’ve really managed to re-invent yourself in so many ways and with such success. Congratulations!

    Reply
    • Lois Winston

      Thanks so much, Caridad! It was fun to do something a little different.

      Reply
  6. Lois Winston

    Thanks so much for featuring me and my new novella today, George!

    Reply

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Terese Mailhot – Best Selling Author of Heart Berries: A Memoir

Terese Marie Mailhot – A New York Times bestseller

Selected by Emma Watson as the Our Shared Shelf Book Club Pick for March/April 2018
A PBS Newshour/New York Times Now Read This Book Club Pick
New York Times Editor’s Choice
Winner of the Spalding Prize for the Promotion of Peace and Justice in Literature
Finalist for the Governor General’s Literary Award for English–Language Nonfiction
A Barnes & Noble Discover Great New Writers Selection
An NPR Best Book of the Year

“There are so many sentences I had to read again because they were so true and beautiful. It’s a memoir of pure poetry and courage and invention. Whenever I think about it, my heart clenches with love.” —Cheryl Strayed, The New York Times Book Review.

“A sledgehammer . . . Her experiments with structure and language . . . are in the service of trying to find new ways to think about the past, trauma, repetition, and reconciliation, which might be a way of saying a new model for the memoir . . . If Heart Berries is any indication, the work to come will not just surface suppressed stories; it might give birth to new forms.” —The New York Times.

Do you write in more than one genre? Yes! I have a novel coming out soon! It’s untitled.

What brought you to writing? I loved my mother’s writing very much. She was the first person who really taught me about writing. I would watch her work nightly on poetry or essay, and I always thought it was honorable work.

Where do you write and do allow any distractions? I write in my bedroom, because it’s the only room in the house I could set up an office. I invite distractions. I’m very lucky in my life. This pandemic has taught me to value family time and I’ve also learned how to enjoy being sidetracked. Those moments of distraction can be inspiring and energizing.

Tell us about your writing process: I write every day until I make my wordcount goal. Then I take a few months off and revise. If it’s for something more urgent, I work relentlessly, nonstop, until it’s as good as it gets for that deadline.

What is the most challenging part of your writing process? Time. Work life getting in the way.

What are you currently working on? The novel. I’m giving it time. I finished the first draft, so it’s about time to revise.

Who’s currently your favorite author? Kiese Laymon or Jesmyn Ward or James Baldwin … it’s too hard to choose!

How long did it take you to write your first book and published? It about 6 years to write. It sold two weeks from the time I sent it out and was published a year after.

We hear of strong-willed characters. Do yours behave, or do they run the show? I like the outsiders. I like writing from the perspective of black sheep types, because their interiority is electric and perceptive, willful, and neglected.

Do your protagonists ever disappoint you? Yes.

Do you try to make the antagonist into a more human character? I think flawed characters are my favorite. I like people written off or disregarded, or people who are misunderstood.

Do you have subplots? If so, how do you weave them into the novel’s arc? I think there are underpinned themes in all the work I do. I think, in my current novel, there’s an underpinned theme of joy and collectivity, and I think of it like taste. Like, there should be many dimensions to a good dish. There should be a lot to savor or value in good food. Maybe I’m hungry. It shouldn’t be overbearing the main course.

Do you raise the stakes for your protagonist—for the antagonist? I like work with little plot. I just throw wrenches at my characters until something strikes me.

Do you outline, or are you a pantser? Both.

What kind of research do you do? A lot. As much as humanly possible from all kinds of sources.

What is the best book you ever read? Giovanni’s Room.

Do you have any advice for new writers? You can do it. It’s harder for some, but nothing is impossible.

Anything else you’d like to tell us about yourself and your books? I write for the women I love. I write for my mother.

How do our readers contact you? Teresemailhot.com

 

 

 

 

 

2 Comments

  1. Elisabeth Tuck

    I’m always interested in books from a different perspective. Thanks, George, for the heads up.

    Reply
  2. Michael A. Black

    Interesting interview– You sound like a very disciplined person, which is a great attribute for a writer. I wish you much success.

    Reply

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Constance Hanstedt – Author – Poet – Leader

Welcome – What book would you like to tell our readers about?

Don’t Leave Yet, How My Mother’s Alzheimer’s Opened My Heart (She Writes Press, 2015) recounts my journey toward understanding our complicated mother-daughter relationship as she struggles through the early stage of dementia-type Alzheimer’s, and my ultimate discovery of compassion and love that goes beyond familial duty.

Do you write in more than one genre? I enjoy the challenge of poetry, creating, and recreating experiences to connect with readers. Finding a precise image or metaphor and using concise and descriptive language engages my mind in sometimes unexpected ways. The discovery can be exhilarating.

What brought you to writing? I was an English major at the University of Wisconsin -Milwaukee. I admired twentieth-century novelists and poets and wondered if I had it in me to create my own work. It wasn’t until after my father died that I began to explore poetry as a way to express grief. A decade later, when my mother was diagnosed with dementia-type Alzheimer’s, my teacher, the terrific poet Ellen Bass, suggested I might explore my experiences further if I went beyond the parameters of poetry. It was then that I turned to prose. It allowed an expansiveness I needed to convey all that I wanted to say. I started by writing vignettes, followed by full scenes with characters, dialogue, and description. Soon I had pages of material with a sense of connectedness.

Where do you write? What, if any, distractions do you allow? I write in my home office, where morning light provides a calm atmosphere and from where I can observe a yellow rose tree and a bevy of finches on the thistle feeder. I don’t tolerate distractions. But I don’t mind my Shih Tsu, Cody, who snores ever so slightly on his bed directly behind me.

Tell us about your writing process: I usually begin writing with a black ballpoint and a Mead notebook. I wrote most of my memoir in notebooks. When I had enough material, I transcribed it into a document on my laptop. I labeled each draft so as not to lose anything interesting or significant. Now I use the same process when writing poetry. 1200

What is the most challenging part of your writing process? Revision is the most challenging. Yet, it’s the part of writing that I enjoy most. I revisit each image and metaphor. When a metaphor doesn’t do its job, I make a list of ten others and then choose the one I think works the best. I also read a poem out loud to gauge the effectiveness of line endings and stanzas. I admit I’m a perfectionist.

What are you currently working on? I’ve recently discovered some old poems that go back several years. I’m trying to revise them but often find myself starting over. I hope to also return to blogging in the near future.

Has an association membership helped you or your writing? The poetry critique group of California Writers Club Tri-Valley Branch, which I lead two times a month, has offered much-needed support as I labor with some of my poems. The members are careful listeners, and they offer critique with enthusiasm. I’ve found the structure and discipline necessary to keep on writing.

Who’s your favorite author? It’s hard to choose just one. I always look forward to reading Jack Kerouac, John Irving, and Jennifer Lauck. My favorite author of all time is John Steinbeck.

What is the best book you ever read? The Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck. I’ve read it at least three times. I admire its structure, honesty, and intense feeling.

How long did it take you to write your first book? It took five years to write Don’t Leave Yet. I belonged to a writing class in 2004 with Ellen Bass, reading pages each week from my notebook for critique. My mother passed away in 2008, and I was uncertain as to whether or not I could continue to write our story. Ellen, and my fellow writers, were instrumental in my effort to bring the manuscript to its completion a year later.

How long to get it published? Don’t Leave Yet was a finalist in the Pacific Northwest Writer’s Conference writing competition in the memoir category in 2011. One agent from San Francisco who attended the Conference found the book interesting, but that was it. I pursued other agents with no luck. Then I heard about Brooke Warner, the publisher of She Writes Press. I worked with an editor she recommended. She Writes published my memoir in 2015.

What authors did you dislike at first but grew to enjoy? When I read Bel Canto by Ann Patchett, I thought I might cross her off my list. But when I discovered Truth and Beauty, I was hooked.

Do you outline, or are you a pantser? I began writing Don’t Leave Yet without an outline. By the time I completed the third chapter, I had decided an outline was necessary since I wove together scenes of the present with those of the past. It was a way of keeping characters and events clear in my mind.

Looking to the future, what’s in store for you? I plan to continue placing my poems in literary journals if I’m lucky. I will also enter my chapbook, Treading Water, in more literary competitions with the goal of publication. It was recently named a finalist in Blue Lights Press writing contest.

Do you have any advice for new writers? First and foremost, be true to yourself. Write what’s meaningful and what you love. Observe the world. Read widely. And don’t ever let others tell you that you can’t write.

How do our readers contact you?

chanstedt@aol.com
https://www.constancehanstedt.com
https://www.facebook.com/pages/Constance-Hanstedt/486020558210730

 

 

3 Comments

  1. Michael A. Black

    Good interview. You gave some excellent advise on writing. Poetry is an excellent way to develop a keen ear for metaphor and succinctness. One of my college mentors was a big Steinbeck fan and did his master’s thesis on contrasting the series of newspaper articles Steinbeck wrote while traveling with the dust bowl families to his subsequent novelization of the experience in The Grapes of Wrath. Good luck with your writing.

    Reply
    • Connie Hanstedt

      Thank you, Michael. I appreciate your comments and recollection of one of your college mentors. John Steinbeck’s novels showed me how an author can connect with readers on so many levels.

      Reply

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