Charlene Bell Dietz lives in the central mountains of New Mexico. She taught kindergarten through high school, was a school administrator, and was an adjunct instructor for the College of Santa Fe. After retirement, she traveled the United States, providing instruction for school staff and administrators. Her writing includes published articles, children’s stories, short stories, and mystery and historical novels.

Elevator Pitch: Move over Susan B. Anthony. There’s an unsung woman asking for the vote 224 years before you, and murderous rebels and bigoted gentlemen can’t prevent spinster Lady Margaret Brent from wielding her power to defend Maryland settlers from plunder and obliteration.

The Spinster, the Rebel, and the Governor by Charlene Bell Dietz – Lady Margaret Brent, compelled to right wrongs, risks her life by illegally educating English women, placing her family at risk. She fights to have a voice, yet her father and brothers exclude her from discussions. Worried the king’s men may know of her illegal activities, she flees to the New World, where she can enjoy religious tolerance and her own land, believing she will be allowed a voice. Once in Maryland, she presents cases in provincial court, where she’s hired as the first American woman attorney. Still, she uncovers perilous actions there, prompting her to build a fort to shield those within from being murdered. Can Margaret Brent’s integrity and ingenuity protect Maryland from being destroyed?

Note:  The American Bar Association honors five deserving women attorneys each year with the Margaret Brent Award. Little has been written or is known about her because she left no primary source material. My research studied the conflicts and social mores of the times and places as well as what the gentlemen of note said about her. Her 134 cases tried before Governor Calvert’s provincial court gave me insight into her personality and voice. What’s astounding is even the gentlemen of the time, 1638-1648, hired her as their attorney.

One of life’s secrets nobody ever tells you is that life is full of unintended consequences. Bet if you think back through the last few days, you’ll discover several times when you wanted to or started to do something, and along with the doing of it, it changed. Maybe slightly, maybe a whole messy lot. I started to fix a leaky faucet. With my wrench and washers in hand, ready to go, the built-up calcium deposits stopped me. Argh. I’d need to get some Blaster-penetrating catalyst. A slight change of plans isn’t a big deal, but here’s how some more serious unintended consequences turned me into a writer.

Never, ever did I want to become a writer. My chosen college classes encompassed art history and studio classes, but I needed a saleable profession. Education became my life. Then, close to retirement, I inherited my mother’s elderly sister. Our family had no other female to be a caregiver (it seems it’s always a female—guess we’re designed to do these things).

Yikes! This redoubtable woman turned the air blue with her chain smoking and language. She started drinking at noon and until she turned out the lights at night, after smoking and reading in bed. This aunt read everything quickly, always begging for more books. Her stories encouraged my husband and me to drink rum and coke with her just to hear more. She ran away from high school at age sixteen to Chicago in 1923 to become an entertainer during prohibition a Flapper in the Roaring Twenties.

When she died, she had left me holding the memories of her incredible life. I couldn’t turn my back on her stories. These were too good not to be told.

After writing a few chapters, I saw a teaser on the internet. “Send us your first page, and we’ll tell you if you have talent.” Ha! I know the scheme, but I did it anyway. Here’s the opening line of my story: “Die, old lady, please just die.”

Within minutes, a New York editor contacted me and asked to see the rest of the few chapters. A week later, he emailed me and praised my quality writing with dialogue but told me this story wouldn’t go anywhere because I didn’t have a plot. Plot? I replied, “But this happens, and then this happens, and then…”  Clearly, my ignorance showed brightly.

He responded, educating me on why that wasn’t plotting. I told him I didn’t have a clue and asked if he would teach me. He agreed. My purse became lighter, but my head became fuller. Ten years later, The Flapper, the Scientist, and the Saboteur found a publisher and went on to win a Kirkus Review’s (starred review) and be named to Kirkus Review’s Best Book of 2018. Now, there’s a huge unintended consequence.

Because this first story received so many awards, it pushed me to continue writing. Each of my stories strives for suspense and mystery. Interestingly, they all have a historical element, which requires lots and lots of research. My current work in progress is a murder mystery series set in Albuquerque in 1967. This is the year marked by the downturn in America’s educational excellence. It takes place in a fictitious high school, Duke City High, and abounds with quirky characters, a flummoxed teacher, and dead bodies. My latest book is a historical biography novel about a spinster, an English woman in 1638, The Spinster, the Rebel, and the Governor. This story tightly follows historical events, revealing how she, as a woman, accomplishes the impossible and saves precolonial Maryland from destruction.

Contact: chardietzpen@gmail.com

https://inkydancestudios.com/ or Char Bell Dietz @CharBellDietz

Purchase: http://apbooks.net/srg.html