Devil in a Blue Dress – Walter Mosley – 1990

“Be a Creator, not a Witness” Walter Mosely

I first read Walter Mosely’s debut novel, Devil in a Blue Dress, sometime around 1994. I was hooked, even though I didn’t know it at the time. I read it in a matter of days and enjoyed it. I can’t tell you much more other than I took a liking to Easy Rawlins. I read a few more of the Rawlins’ stories and moved on to other authors.

Fast forward to 2020 and the Covid lockdown. I put out the dollars for MasterClass (https://www.masterclass.com). The selling point was Joyce Carol Oates. I once feared her for the horror she conveyed in “Where Are You Going, Where Have You Been?” I’ve since come to admire her and her work. I subscribed to the program and found it enlightening. Recently Walter Mosley was added to the lessons. When I saw his name, I didn’t recall who he was, and I wondered why he sounded vaguely familiar. Still, or maybe because he seemed familiar, I decided to watch his talks. Within minutes of watching his talks, I knew he was talking directly to me. When Mosley started discussing character development for Devil in a Blue Dress, I remembered the book. I also remembered that the woman was the catalyst, not the protagonist.

Mosley read the first paragraph, and I was hooked again. As soon as the break came in the talk, I tried to find a print copy. Not much luck, so I braved the outside world and drove to Half Price Books. None in stock, but they could order copies from Texas. I ordered two, one for me and one for my oldest daughter, a voracious reader. The books arrived a week later. I read the first line, “I was surprised to see a white man walk into Joppy’s bar.” Seeing it in print was even more vital than when Walter Mosley read it to me. I finished the book in two sittings.

I was amazed at the power in Mosley’s words. I found myself enthralled, stopping, and rereading paragraph after paragraph. I have to stop doing that if I ever want to finish! The pages flew by at an astonishing pace.

Walter Mosley’s novel and his Master Class lectures are similar lessons on life—the world’s reality.

Novel and lecture intertwined, Mosley tells the reader and the audience a story of life. He brings out the horrors of genocide, racism, child abuse, incest, and war with his poignant vignettes—each riveting and evocative.

In a few short paragraphs, Mosley conveys the monstrous cruelty of the concentration camps of Nazi Germany to life.

Walter Mosley reinforces the importance of conflict and growth as Easy Rawlins overcomes one obstacle after another. During my reading, I became Easy Rawlins; his thoughts were my thoughts. I felt the emotions, the fear, the joy. This author managed to engage me at every level.

Walter Mosley is a Master.

3 Comments

  1. Michael A. Black

    I red the book years ago as well, George. He did a few more novels in the series featuring Easy Rollins, and other stuff as well. They made Devil in a Blue Dress into a movie starring Denzel Washington, which stuck pretty close to the book. The late Paul Winfield did the readings on the audio book versions of the series.

    Reply
    • George Cramer

      Winfield’s voice would be great for the story. I didn’t see the movie because I figured it would be much different than the book. After your comment, I’ll have to find it.

      Reply
  2. Kat Wilder

    I love your enthusiasm! Definitely makes me want to read the book!

    Reply

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