Thonie Hevron – Public Servant / Author / Friend

“The Felony Murder Rule is a real winner.” Michael A. Black

Thonie Hevron is a retired 911 dispatcher who makes her home in Petaluma in the Sonoma Wine Country, California with her husband, Danny. When not writing, Thonie rides horses and enjoys traveling. Her work has appeared in Beyond Borders: 2014 Redwood Writers Anthology and Felons, Flames and Ambulance Rides: Public Safety Writers 2013 Anthology. She is the author of four award-winning mystery/thriller novels, By Force or Fear, Intent to Hold, and With Malice Aforethought, are currently available on Amazon but will be re-published by Aakenbaaken & Kent (A&K) in the future. A&K has published the fourth mystery, Felon with a Firearm.

Please tell us about Felony Murder Rule and any comments about any other of your books: All the titles are elements of the main crime. My newest book is titled, Felony Murder Rule, which mandated a sentencing enhancement for felonies committed in which a homicide results. In 2018, this rule was abolished in California with one exception. The book takes place in 2018 before the court ruling. Meredith and Nick are tossed into a decades old crime involving her father. The clock is ticking as rival criminal factions jockey to use her to find a cache of stolen money.

At home one night, sheriff’s detective Meredith Ryan surprises an intruder leaning over her baby’s crib. Unable to catch him, she launches a dangerous journey to protect her family. The death of her father the next day steers her onto a path of deceit and mystery where the two incidents are connected by the mysterious man in her nursery. With Nick, her husband, they unravel her father’s involvement in a robbery/homicide years ago. To find the hidden loot, competing crime rivals plot to use her family as bargaining chips. Meredith and Nick must find the truth in the next 24 hours before the criminals close in on her family.

My series is called the Nick and Meredith Mysteries, but they’re really more thrillers than classic mysteries. They are stand-alones but follow Sonoma County Sheriff’s detectives on different cases. In By Force or Fear (an element of stalking), Meredith is stalked by a judge while she tracks a killer. Intent to Hold (an element of kidnapping) follows Nick and Meredith as they go to Mexico to rescue a relative being held hostage by a cartel. With Malice Aforethought is a necessary component of murder and a homicide is what the detective partners are investigating when they stumble upon a militia with violent plans.

What are you currently working on? I’m currently re-editing my first book, By Force or Fear. My current publisher, Aakenbaaken & Kent, has committed to re-publishing the three previous Nick and Meredith Mysteries. I want it ready when he hollers for it. They are currently on Amazon and self-published.

Has an association membership helped you or your writing? Yes, as a matter of fact. I belong to two such organizations. First, I joined the Police Writer Association back in 1997 or so when I first began to write seriously. It’s morphed into the Public Safety Writers Association. The thought of a bunch of police/fire/medical emergency personnel writing was captivating. Writing is a solitary enterprise—or at least, it used to be. The bottom line is you get what you give: I’ve gotten so much from these members. Expertise and experience sharing, networking, and building relationships with professionals from across the continent (including Canada). Sometimes, it’s just a shoulder (Marilyn, did you hear that?), but I found a terrific mentor and some darn good friends in this group. The second, Redwood Writers is my local writers club. Through membership and volunteering, I found out about goal setting, marketing strategies, immense help with the writing craft, and again, building relationships.

We hear of strong-willed characters. Do yours behave, or do they run the show? My first novel took me almost a decade to write, so I was pretty clear on who was going to do what. By the time I was underway with the second manuscript, I had a plan, but these darn main characters decided to hijack the story. Originally, Nick and Meredith were partners and not supposed to fall in love. But things being what they are, in Intent to Hold, their feelings for each other emerged. By the third story, With Malice Aforethought, they both knew a relationship was unavoidable. So yeah, they tend to run the show.

Do you base any of your characters on real people? Funny, people ask me that all the time. Most of my characters are a mash-up of people I’ve known throughout my career in law enforcement. The criminal types are complete fiction, but the cop and civilians are part ‘so-and-so’ with a dash of ‘that guy.’ The only exception was a peripheral character in Malice. One of my readers recognized him (we had both worked with him), and we got a good laugh. He’d passed away at that point.

Do you outline, or are you a pantser? I’m an inveterate outliner. I like structure, and in mysteries/thrillers, the author has to intersperse clues and red herrings in appropriate places. I don’t like to go back and do it, so I plan them out. But, as I said above, sometimes the characters have their own agendas and take over the story. Thank God for computers. I’d hate to have to do all that on a typewriter.

What is the best book you ever read? Hands down, Larry McMurtry’s Lonesome Dove. It has everything: drama, history, humor, romance, physicality, and horses.

Looking to the future, what’s in store for you? I’ve got another book percolating while I do my edits. It will be a new set of characters that I hope readers will be equally fascinated with. For now, it’s set in Ireland. I’ve never been there, but once Covid 19 is under control, I plan on traveling there and anywhere else where I can persuade my husband to go. He’s ready, too.

Comment by Michael A. Black: Thonie Hevron’s latest novel, The Felony Murder Rule, is a real winner. The engaging characters had me rooting for Meredith and Nick all the way through this complex case that involves a crime from the past that comes to roost in the present. Ms. Hevron’s smooth and elegant writing style, combined with the intricate plot and excellent characterization, makes it a very pleasant reading experience. ~ Michael A. Black, author of Legends of the WestDying Art and Cold Fury in the Executioner series (as Don Pendleton), and Gunslinger: Killer’s Brand (as A.W. Hart).

Where can our visitors contact you or buy your books?

With Malice Aforethought,

Intent to Hold

By Force or Fear

Felony Murder Rule

Featured book on Local Authors Distributor FB page

Facebook Thonie Hevron Author Page

Website: thoniehevron.com

Email: badgec65@gmail.com

9 Comments

  1. Jeane Slone

    Excellent interview questions, George.
    I love selling Thonie’s books at 3 Farmer’s Markets, two in Santa Rosa and one in Petaluma. Our local people love to read books that take place in their county. Thonie’s latest book is very popular and is set in her town of Petaluma, I love telling people that there is a chase scene on D Street! Keep writing Thonie you have a great fan base being established!
    Jeane Slone, distributor of local authors books.
    info@jeaneslone.com

    Reply
  2. Vicki Weisfeld

    Great interview. I’ll order the new book. Liked your comment about Lonesome Dove. My great-grandparents lived in Loving, Texas, a small town established on land owned by the grandson of cattle driver Oliver Loving, who with Charles Goodnight, created a famous cattle trail, well west of the Chisolm Trail. Lonesome Dove is a slightly fictionalized account of one of their cattle drives. So I always feel a pang of association when that novel comes up!

    Reply
    • Thonie Hevron

      Fascinating to hear of your association.. I always thought the Goodnight Ranch was the inspiration for Lonesome Dove.

      Reply
  3. Michael A. Black

    I was lucky enough to read an ARC of The Felony Murder Rule and thought it was a great read. I highly recommend it. Thonie’s an excellent writer.

    Reply
    • Thonie Hevron

      Thanks for the great comment, Mike. Coming from you means a lot!

      Reply
  4. John Schembra

    I’m half-way through “Felony Murder Rule” and can’t put it down. A wonderful story with great characters. I’ve read the first three books, and hope Thonie continues writing about the adventures of Nick and Meredith.

    Reply
    • Thonie Hevron

      Thanks, John. I think they have one more case hatching.

      Reply
  5. Marilyn Meredith

    Thanks for mentioning me, Thonie, at least I hope it was me. This is a really good book , folks. I’ve read them all, and if you like mysteries, be sure and get Thonie’s.

    Reply
    • Thonie Hevron

      Yes, Marilyn. That was you! You’ve given me some darn good advice through the years. You’re also one of the few offered shoulders that I trust. Thanks for that!

      Reply

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Keith Bettinger – Multi-Disciplinary Writer

END OF WATCH

MURDER IN MCHENRY

FIGHTING CRIME WITH “SOME DAY” AND LENNY

Do you write in more than one genre? I’ve written nonfiction, fiction, comedy, poetry, short stories, and articles that required research.

What brought you to writing? What got me into writing was going to grad school.  I did lots of research (I really enjoy doing research.  I would rather turn in large term papers than take a test.)  I was doing a paper on dreams related to Post Shooting Trauma and contacted Massad Ayoob for an interview.  He was very kind and informative.  I asked him if he would like a copy when I finished the paper.  He said yes.  Then he did something I never expected.  He took it to the editor of POLICE MARKSMAN magazine, and they wanted to publish it.  If not for Mr. Ayoob’s kindness, I probably wouldn’t have a writing career that spans almost 40 years.

Where do you write? What, if any, distractions do you allow? I have a loft in my home.  I have converted it into my Man Cave.  It not only has my computer but has my filing cabinets, a stereo, and my awards for both writing and police work.

Tell us about your writing process: I like to come up with an idea and write and rewrite. The difficult part is finding something that not only interests me but will be of interest to readers.

What are you currently working on? Right now, I am working on a short story for the Public Safety Writers Association writing contest.

 

Has an association membership helped you or your writing? Yes.  The Wednesday Warrior Writers, a Las Vegas group of local writers, meet 2 Wednesdays a month.  We put together two books.  The one I like the best is I PLEDGE ALLEGIANCE… a book of 54 short stories dealing with patriotism, heroism, and Americana.  The book is published locally by Houdini Publishing. All profits from the sale of the book go to nonprofits that serve active military, veterans, and first responders.  We have raised approximately one thousand dollars for the USO at Las Vegas’ McCarran Airport, two hundred for VETERAN’s VILLAGE, and a couple hundred for T.A.P.P.S.  an organization of professional musicians who play trumpet and volunteer their time and talent to make sure veterans who pass away receive Taps played on a real trumpet, not a recording.  For all our veterans have done for this country, they deserve a real final tribute for their service and sacrifice.

Who’s your favorite author? I would have to say my favorite author is Michael Connelly and his Harry Bosch series.  My other favorite, W. E. B. Griffin, just passed away last year.

How long did it take you to write your first book? My first book (End of Watch) was written and rewritten many times and eventually self-published.  My second book, FIGHTING CRIME WITH “SOME DAY” AND LENNY, was originally published by Universe.

How long to get it published? It was probably done within a year.

How do you come up with character names? Sometimes I will look in phone books.  If I do that, I mix first and last names.  Other times I think about names I like and create an identity that way.  “Some Day,” my character in the comedy book, was a spoof on Dragnet’s Joe Friday.

We hear of strong-willed characters. Do yours behave, or do they run the show? I think most of my characters are individuals.  Even those in my many short stories work together with their partners.

What’s the most challenging thing about writing characters from the opposite sex? Keeping the storyline clean.  Would I let my wife read this?

Do your protagonists ever disappoint you? I don’t think so.  They may stumble along the way, but they learn a life lesson by the end of the story.

Do you ever kill a popular character? If so, what happens to your story? I wrote a fiction short story, and I killed off a character, a K9. I figured if Disney could kill Ole Yeller, I could kill my character.  I took for granted that people would realize it was fiction. The story was published in the FOP Journal.  I received a call from the office staff; a K9 officer wanted to speak to me.  I called the officer, and she told me she wanted to meet the handler in the story.  I told her it was impossible since the story was fiction.  She yelled, “You bastard!”  you had me and my entire family crying, and it was make believe!

Do you base any of your characters on real people? Yes, but with a lot of literary license.

Do you outline, or are you a pantser? Probably a bit of both.  I like doing research, but with short stories,  I like to sit in front of the computer and let the story flow.

What kind of research do you do? I like doing interviews.  Getting the story from the protagonist and letting him check my material to see if it correct.

Where do you place your settings—real or fictional locations? I use fictional locations.  I try to keep it beautiful but general, so people think they know what location I am writing about.

What is the best book you ever read? I would have to say almost all the works of W. E. B. Griffin. He combined history and characters into a story that worked so well you didn’t want to put any of his books down.

Looking to the future, what’s in store for you? I have been thinking about a story for years.  I just didn’t know if I wanted a fictional story about a location that I know from experience or to make it completely fictional.  Also, do I really want to get involved in a long writing process or stay with short stories?

Do you have any advice for new writers? Don’t be overcome by rejection.  Use rejection as a learning tool.  Find a writers group or gentle critique group. Also, learn to love writing and storytelling but don’t expect to become rich.  If you do, then you will be disappointed.

How do our readers contact you? keithbettt@cox.net

10 Comments

  1. cliff

    Keith is a outstanding author and person

    Reply
  2. Ray Kennedy

    hay Keith.. Congrats.. nice to hear a super success story of someone I knew and worked with many years ago who is now successful and famous… btw.. you probably don’t remember me ‘on the job’ with you …I’ve been out and gone close to 31 years .. stay well and keep it going with even more success with your writings

    Reply
  3. Thonie Hevron

    I enjoyed hearing about your processes, Keith. Naming characters is always fun and we all do it differently. Thanks for this interview, George!

    Reply
  4. Jackie Taylor Zortman

    Enjoyed reading your blog post, Keith. For those who do not know this, Keith was the first published writer to edit the manuscript for my first book WE ARE DIFFERENT NOW via the PSWA many years ago. Due to the relationship we developed in that time period, he has always remained very near and dear to my heart. I read anything Keith writes and shares and he’s never disappointed me.

    Reply
  5. Hank Gallo

    Thanks for publishing a background on Keith, George. I really enjoyed reading “FIGHTING CRIME WITH “SOME DAY” AND LENNY” when it was published.

    Reply
  6. Michael A. Black

    Good hearing from you, Keith. As has been cited in the above comments, Keith is a damn good writer and an outstanding human being. He’s generous and heroic, and is always looking to help others. His humor and passion come through in his writing.

    Reply
  7. John Schembra

    Good interview, Keith. You are too modest on your dozens of writing awards. An excellent writer, and a friend, I hope we can get together this year in Las Vegas.

    Reply
  8. Madeline Gornell

    Great hearing from you, Keith! You were very kind and gracious to me at my first couple PSWA conferences and I remember you with fondness. Great interview learning your background. Keep safe.

    Reply
  9. Marilyn Meredith

    Keith has been a friend for many years thanks to P.S.W.A. He has a great humorous streak which shows in some of his writing. Keith has done many wonderful things along the way such as helping out after the horrible killing spree at that outdoor concert in Vegas. Thanks for the interview.

    Reply

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Devil in a Blue Dress – Walter Mosley – 1990

“Be a Creator, not a Witness” Walter Mosely

I first read Walter Mosely’s debut novel, Devil in a Blue Dress, sometime around 1994. I was hooked, even though I didn’t know it at the time. I read it in a matter of days and enjoyed it. I can’t tell you much more other than I took a liking to Easy Rawlins. I read a few more of the Rawlins’ stories and moved on to other authors.

Fast forward to 2020 and the Covid lockdown. I put out the dollars for MasterClass (https://www.masterclass.com). The selling point was Joyce Carol Oates. I once feared her for the horror she conveyed in “Where Are You Going, Where Have You Been?” I’ve since come to admire her and her work. I subscribed to the program and found it enlightening. Recently Walter Mosley was added to the lessons. When I saw his name, I didn’t recall who he was, and I wondered why he sounded vaguely familiar. Still, or maybe because he seemed familiar, I decided to watch his talks. Within minutes of watching his talks, I knew he was talking directly to me. When Mosley started discussing character development for Devil in a Blue Dress, I remembered the book. I also remembered that the woman was the catalyst, not the protagonist.

Mosley read the first paragraph, and I was hooked again. As soon as the break came in the talk, I tried to find a print copy. Not much luck, so I braved the outside world and drove to Half Price Books. None in stock, but they could order copies from Texas. I ordered two, one for me and one for my oldest daughter, a voracious reader. The books arrived a week later. I read the first line, “I was surprised to see a white man walk into Joppy’s bar.” Seeing it in print was even more vital than when Walter Mosley read it to me. I finished the book in two sittings.

I was amazed at the power in Mosley’s words. I found myself enthralled, stopping, and rereading paragraph after paragraph. I have to stop doing that if I ever want to finish! The pages flew by at an astonishing pace.

Walter Mosley’s novel and his Master Class lectures are similar lessons on life—the world’s reality.

Novel and lecture intertwined, Mosley tells the reader and the audience a story of life. He brings out the horrors of genocide, racism, child abuse, incest, and war with his poignant vignettes—each riveting and evocative.

In a few short paragraphs, Mosley conveys the monstrous cruelty of the concentration camps of Nazi Germany to life.

Walter Mosley reinforces the importance of conflict and growth as Easy Rawlins overcomes one obstacle after another. During my reading, I became Easy Rawlins; his thoughts were my thoughts. I felt the emotions, the fear, the joy. This author managed to engage me at every level.

Walter Mosley is a Master.

3 Comments

  1. Michael A. Black

    I red the book years ago as well, George. He did a few more novels in the series featuring Easy Rollins, and other stuff as well. They made Devil in a Blue Dress into a movie starring Denzel Washington, which stuck pretty close to the book. The late Paul Winfield did the readings on the audio book versions of the series.

    Reply
    • George Cramer

      Winfield’s voice would be great for the story. I didn’t see the movie because I figured it would be much different than the book. After your comment, I’ll have to find it.

      Reply
  2. Kat Wilder

    I love your enthusiasm! Definitely makes me want to read the book!

    Reply

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Dave Freedland, Mystery/Thriller Writer

Deputy Chief Freedland, (Ret.) Irvine Police Department (CA) had a long and action-packed law enforcement career in addition to his writing.

 

 

 

 

In The Pepper Tree,” a Southern California landmark primarily known only to law enforcement earned a reputation for crime scenes of the most unspeakably vicious murders. Infamous serial killers had chosen this location to discard and display their victims as trophies of their horrific acts. Lieutenant Scott Hunter leads a team of detectives seeking to capture the perpetrator who targets young women and has selected this landmark to showcase his victims.

This story is a work of fiction, but the Orange County location is real. So notorious, in fact, that those officers working the graveyard shift need only radio their activity at a site bearing two words – “pepper tree,” and they are immediately dispatched a back-up officer.

As a young patrol officer, Hunter had been introduced to the “terror at the tree” on an evening when he turned his police cruiser down that dusty road separating asparagus fields and discovered a corpse hanging from a tree limb. But now, as the leader of the Robbery/Homicide team, he received that most dreaded call interrupting the stillness of the night, a body dump.

Tell us about your writing process:  In my 34-year law enforcement career, I worked assignments that included SWAT, Detectives, Training Bureau, Internal Affairs, and a street-level, Narcotic Suppression Unit. I would think about the most unique cases and then start outlining a plot using other actual investigations to complement the storyline. I developed a protagonist based upon a handful of mentors from my career who exhibited strong moral character and superior technical and physical skill-sets. I included sub-plots to give readers opportunities to speculate on the primary suspect’s identity and included a romantic character that matched the protagonist in interest and intellect.

What is the most challenging part of your writing process? Trying to include sufficient detail in a criminal investigation to convince the reader that the story is credible without getting wrapped up in the scientific minutia can be particularly challenging. I remember working on my first novel, “Lincoln 9.” I was constantly thinking that the most cantankerous detective was looking over my shoulder, criticizing my failure to include steps 3 & 4 in my homicide investigation. As I read more crime thrillers written by successful authors, I realized that it was more important to include a few choice technical procedures and get into the characters’ minds and emotions.

What are you currently working on? I’m working on my third novel, which involves homicides and human trafficking cases that will take the characters to Japan in pursuit of suspects and victims. The first chapter begins with a graphic, contract-style hit that my department worked in conjunction with the FBI, which led investigators into the mysterious world of assassins for hire. During my years of competing in martial arts, I had the occasion to train in Japan and visited several dojos (training halls) located near some of the darker parts of society. It should provide some intrigue and texture to the pursuit of international crime syndicates in the Orient.

What is the best book you ever read? Charles Dickens’ “A Tale of Two Cities” was my favorite book and was a masterpiece in the preparation of a surprise ending. It is the total package: history, romance, fascinating characters, and intense suspense. Dickens has always been considered a master of developing memorable characters. But in this historical novel, he presents some of the most fascinating people whose lives are impacted by the French Revolution. Whose names are perfectly suited to their personalities.

Anything else you’d like to tell us about yourself and your books? Twenty-five years of my career involved serving in several areas of responsibility in Special Weapons and Tactics Teams (SWAT), which included Hostage Negotiator, Scout, Team Leader, and Team Commander. Our team was well-trained and well-financed. Based upon our successful operations and competition performances, the California Association of Tactical Officers sponsored our team to compete in the International SWAT Round-Up in Florida. We have had training relationships with members of SEAL Teams 3 & 5, and one of the firearms trainers for the U.S. Army’s Delta Force comes to California one weekend a year to train our team members. In each of my books, I introduce the reader to some aspect of a SWAT operation; a look behind the curtain of secrecy shrouding how SWAT operators perform. Based upon reviews, readers have found this piece of the plot an interesting addition to the fabric of the story.

 

 

 

 

When you visit my author’s website, www.davefreedland.com, you will find several photos from SWAT operations and training scenarios in which I have participated.

I would like to thank George Cramer for inviting me to share on his blog. Please take a visit to my website, and hopefully, one or more of my books will interest you. If you have a technical question, I always find time to respond.

Best Wishes,

Dave

Website:      www.davefreedland.com

Links:          Facebook: Dave Freedland          Instagram:    dfreedland01

 

4 Comments

  1. John Schembra

    Good interview, Dave. I enjoyed your books a lot. Your attention to detail is great, without being burdensome, and your characters come alive on the pages. Hope to get your 3rd book soon!

    Reply
  2. Madeline Gornell

    Good interview, Dave, I was fascinated by your experiences and the impact they must have on your writing. Thanks for sharing.

    Reply
  3. Deven Greene

    Very interesting interview. I lived in Orange County for a while years ago. I’m wondering where the pepper tree is.

    Reply
  4. Michael A. Black

    Dave Freedland is the real deal. Having read his novels and seen his presentation on SWAT Tactics at the PSWA conference, I can attest to his abilities as both a writer and a superior police officer. Dave’s the guy who’s been there, walked the walk, and can talk the talk, but with a modesty and humility that belies his accomplishments. The self-discipline he’s obviously learned through a lifetime in the martial arts is evident in the way he moves. Plus, his handshake is unintentionally strong enough to make a grown man wince. 😉 Check out his great books.

    Reply

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Deven Green – Researcher, Biochemist, Traveler – Author

My debut novel, Unnatural, Erica Rosen MD Trilogy Book 1, is a medical thriller

Unnatural features a San Francisco pediatrician who happens upon a Chinese girl with blue eyes. Puzzled by this seeming impossibility (Chinese people have brown or occasionally green eyes – but not blue), Erica eventually learns that the girl is the product of embryonic stem cell gene editing performed at a secret government facility in China. Erica and her roommate, Daisy (a Chinese American), head off to China to expose the secret operation and rescue the girl’s younger brother, who is being held at the secret facility.

Do you outline, or are you a pantser? I’m in between. I have a definite plot and resolution in mind, as well as many of the stops along the way. However, I do not make a detailed outline. As I write, I’ve found that I come up with ideas that are better than many I think of ahead of time, so I go along with those changes.

Do you write in more than one genre? I’ve been sticking to the suspense/thriller genre, mostly medical suspense/thriller. I enjoy using my background in biochemistry and medicine when developing my plots. Keeping the details accurate is challenging and fun.

What is your writing process? I come up with a general concept, either something I’ve read about or something that pops into my head. After that, I need time to develop a plot around the concept. For Unnatural, I decided to write about embryonic stem cell gene editing. Then I figured out the where and the who. My writing is more plot-driven than character-driven, although I do put a lot of thought into developing the characters.

What kind of research do you do?  I do a lot of research. For instance, for Unnatural, I learned about gene editing with CRISPR/Cas9. The technology that forms the backbone of my story, by reading A Crack in Creation by Jennifer Doudna and Samuel Sternberg. Dr. Doudna recently won the Nobel Prize for her work in that area. Another book I read was Young China by Zach Dychtwald, where I learned a lot about the current culture.  I also read relevant references online. I find the internet indispensable not only for researching the scientific aspects of my writing but also for maps, pictures, videos, and information on hotels, airline flights, and general fact-checking. I’ve found that such research often leads to pesky emails and website ads for things, such as hotels and restaurants in Beijing. A small price to pay for all the information I can gather from the comfort of my home.

Where do you write? I like to write in my home office, at my PC. I bought myself a large, curved screen a year ago, which makes my writing much easier. I can have my word document open while I search the internet for information. Sometimes I’ll reference an eBook I display on my screen. When I have finished the whole novel, I can scroll through many pages at a time to look for underlines Word has made. I find the large screen to be very efficient. I prefer to work in a quiet environment, but since I don’t live alone, that’s often impossible.  When I’m traveling (something I barely remember doing, but which I hope to do in the future), I bring my laptop but mostly use that only for typing short stories and editing, not for novel writing. For that, I like my home setup.

How much of your plots or characters are drawn from real life? All of my characters are fictional, although I give many of them attributes I have gleaned from people I have encountered. For instance, in the first novel I wrote (unpublished at this time), one of the characters was a graduate student in biochemistry who was also a nun. That’s an unusual combination.  However, years ago, when I was a biochemistry graduate student myself, there was another graduate student who was also a nun. Strangely, she also had a prosthetic leg. I let my fictional graduate student keep both her legs because one has to be careful not to make fiction as bizarre as real life often is—readers won’t go for it.

As I am very familiar with laboratory and hospital settings, it is easy for me to come up with accurate descriptions.  I had to google some specialized laboratories and equipment, however, to accurately describe some things. I found YouTube videos extremely helpful.

What are you currently working on? I am working on books two and three of the trilogy. Book two is titled Unwitting; I haven’t decided on a name for the third book. While the main story in Unnatural reaches a resolution, the next two books include developments in the lives of Erica and other characters introduced in book one, as well as new problems Erica finds herself thrust into.

How do readers contact you?

I can be contacted through my website https://www.devengreene.com

My blog is https://www.devengreene.com/blog

My Facebook page is https://www.facebook.com/devengreeneauthor

My Instagram name is: devengreeneauthor

 

 

 

6 Comments

  1. Jim Hasse

    I enjoyed reading parts of Unnatural as it was being developed, and my wife is reading the book right now. Researching what the Chinese are doing, it all seems very plausible. I look forward to Unwitting.

    Reply
  2. Deven Greene

    Thanks for reading the interview, Michael. When I wrote the novel, I had no idea the Chinese were already involved in the type of human gene editing forbidden by international agreement. Scary stuff!

    Reply
    • John Schembra

      Good interview, Doc. I’m really enjoying the book. The characters are realistic, the plot believable, and your writing style is great! I am looking forward to the next two! Keep,writing!

      Reply
  3. Michael A. Black

    Good interview. The topic sounds interesting,especially in view of the reports that the Chinese are involved in all sorts of gene splicing research activities with their military. Goo luck with your writing.

    Reply

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