VALERIE J. BROOKS – Author of the Femmes-Noir Angeline Porter Trilogy

Valerie J. Brooks is a multi-award-winning author of femmes-noir thrillers where the women are badass and take center stage. The first in the Angeline Porter Trilogy Revenge in 3 Parts, was a finalist for the Nancy Pearl Book Award. NYTimes bestselling author Kevin O’Brien called her second novel Tainted Times 2 “… a real nail-biter from the first page to the last.”

 

Valerie is a member of Sisters in Crime and the Pacific Northwest Writers Association. She teaches workshops and classes on writing noir and creating plot twists.

1 Last Betrayal A former criminal defense attorney receives an alarming text and races in desperation to Florida only to find a ransacked apartment, a poisoned dog, and a missing half-sister.

Let me tell you a story – When I was sixteen, I worked as a New England Tel & Tel switchboard operator. Back then, this was a prime job for someone my age, but it could also be boring, sitting there, waiting for lights that indicated a call.

One day, I connected a call from a Laconia phone booth to a Massachusetts number. I asked the caller to deposit the correct amount of change for the three-minute call, connected the two numbers, and closed the switch. I went on to other calls.

After three minutes were up, I went back to the call. As I did with all calls made from a phone booth, I pulled back the switch to listen in on the call so I could break in during a lull in the conversation without the caller knowing.

What I heard felt so dangerous that I couldn’t talk. The man from the Boston number was setting up a hit with the man in the phone booth. I wish I could remember the conversation, but I did understand that the Boston man gave instructions to the man in the phone booth to kill someone who lived in Belknap Acres, a ritzy, gated residential area that was rumored to have an armed guard at the gate.

I wrote down the two phone numbers and the name of the Boston man associated with the number. I wrote down the few specifics I was able to hear. The conversation was short.

After they hung up and I disconnected the line, I questioned what I heard. Was I imagining it? Was it a joke? But I’d heard too many rumors about Belknap Acres and what went on there, who lived there, why there was an armed guard. I had no idea who was supposed to be killed, but I did have an address.

I had to work a little longer before I could signal the switchboard foreman that I needed to speak with her. We went into her office, and I told her about what I had heard.

“I’m sorry, but I can’t do anything about this,” she said. “You know we’re not allowed to listen in on calls, and we would have to explain how we heard this information.”

I knew the rules but thought this situation would be different. Someone was going to get killed.

All afternoon, I worried about the call. The hit was planned for that evening. I decided to tell my parents when I got home. They were strict with us kids about living by the rules, but I figured they wouldn’t care that I listened in, not for something like this, and Dad often talked about how corrupt Massachusetts was.

Right away, my mom called the FBI. We figured that someone would take the info over the phone, and that would be that.

Instead, twenty minutes later, two FBI special agents knocked on our door. My parents invited them in. One sat down across from me while the other stood by the door. They wore street clothes, no suits. The agent who asked me questions seemed like anyone I’d run into in town—non-descript shirt and pants, a little overweight, a kind smile. I answered all his questions and gave him the piece of paper that I had saved with all the info. The agent spoke softly and made me feel comfortable, not what I’d pictured from an FBI agent. He thanked me for calling them. I asked him if he’d let us know what happens. He just smiled and said, “No. You won’t find out anything about this unless, for some reason, something happens that the news finds out about.”

He thanked my parents, and they left. We never heard anything else. My dad said they must have been working on a local case, and it could have had to do with the information I gave them.

That was the beginning of my interest in mobs and the FBI.

Now to back up a bit – I’d always loved dark stories, gothic tales of secrets, and writers like Wilkie Collins and Daphne du Maurier. Later I fell in love with Jean Ryss novels. Growing up in New Hampshire added to my interest. As children who were expected to be seen and not heard during adult gatherings, we heard plenty. Families worked hard to be perceived as perfect, but we knew better. Perception is a tricky bit of flimflammery because truth seeps out. And who better to know this than children who seemed to be invisible. Early on, I was aware of what I would later call hypocrisy, but because it didn’t pertain to me at the time, I didn’t explore it until much later when I moved to Oregon and began writing.

My interest in the underbelly of life took full bloom while taking college courses in film noir. I loved the voice, the tropes, and the truthful examination of our culture, lifestyles, and capitalistic drive/greed. For me, noir dispelled the fantasy idea of “happy ever after” and “justice wins.” Perry Mason was a fantasy of good winning over evil. Of course, we need fantasy to escape the hard realities at times, but I just couldn’t write like that or write in black and white. As the brilliant Dennis Lehane says, “I live in the gray.”

Living in the gray when you’re a writer sometimes makes the work harder. How do I give a satisfying ending? What do my characters do that make them fascinating? Usually, my characters are like me, except they push boundaries as I never would. For example, Angeline has killed two mobsters in self-defense. Could I ever do that? I don’t know, but I love her for it.

Being a pantser, I start my thrillers with a setting. I might have an idea about the character, but as in my first of the Angeline Porter Trilogy, I wanted to set my story in Paris. Having been to Paris in 2015 and having taken many notes, Angeline came to life, stepping off the Metro. With the second in the trilogy, the setting had to be New Hampshire, where I grew up. There’s not as much action, but there’s a lot of atmosphere and secrets that Angeline discovers, setting her on a direct path to the third thriller I just finished, 1 Last Betrayal. The secrets lead her to trying to save a sister she never knew she had. Off to Hollywood, Florida, where mobsters ruled back in the day. Its history made me yearn to know more about the setting, which was perfect for the “final showdown” with the mob.

Now I’m immersed in the promoting and launching of the third thriller. I miss my characters. Miss them terribly. I’m tempted to write another Angeline story. “We shall see,” as my Brit mom used to say. One thing I know for sure—I need to start writing again. Whatever the story.

Valerie’s short story prequel to the Angeline Porter trilogy is available for free.
Download it here: “Lake Winnisquam 1982

https://valeriejbrooks.com

https://www.facebook.com/FemmesNoirFiction/

https://www.instagram.com/valeriejbrooksauthor/

https://twitter.com/ValinParis

https://www.pinterest.com/valinparis/

https://www.linkedin.com/in/valeriejbrooks/

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bmlKViIkOnk&t=30s

https://www.tiktok.com/@valeriebrooksauthor

 

17 Comments

  1. ana

    What a story! That call must have been chilling. Can’t wait to read your books.

    Reply
    • Valerie J. Brooks

      Ana,
      Thanks so much for stopping by! For a 16-year-old is was chilling and exciting. I used to watch PERRY MASON with mom, and I always loved the idea that justice wins out in the end. But as I got older, that went away.
      My books are available on Amazon. Let me know what you think! I love getting fan mail.
      Valerie

      Reply
  2. Valerie J. Brooks

    Thank you, George, for inviting me to your blog.
    Sharing stories like this is the equivalent of sitting around the fire and swapping tales, something we rarely do anymore.
    It was so nice to meet everyone and thanks for your comments.
    Valerie

    Reply
  3. Valerie Brooks

    Thank you, George, for inviting me to your blog.
    Sharing stories like this is the equivalent of sitting around the fire and swapping tales, something we rarely do anymore.
    It was so nice to meet everyone and thanks for your comments.
    Valerie

    Reply
  4. John Schembra

    Wonderful story! What an experience for a 16-year-old to experience! I agree with Mike- you should turn your experience into a novel- It would be a good one. Imagine the adventures the operator could get involved in!

    Reply
    • Valerie Brooks

      Hi John,
      I have thought about that! It would make a great novel AND I wouldn’t have to deal with cell phones!
      Thanks for dropping by,
      Valerie

      Reply
  5. Donnell

    Fantastic story. I call events like this germs. They grow and cultivate. Soon they’re so contagious you develop the writing disease. Great story and well done!

    Reply
    • Valerie Brooks

      Thanks so much, Donnell!
      Isn’t it interesting that these gems sometimes don’t pop up until the mind wants to let them loose? As writers, I think we have a deep well of memories that contribute to our stories.
      Thanks for the kudos!
      Valerie

      Reply
  6. Michael A. Black

    What a neat story. It could be the beginning of a neat novel, especially with the obtuse supervisor. That woman must have been in on it. 😉 Back when there were still payphones, the operators used to routinely listen in when calls were made to police departments or to report an emergency. One time we’d arrested one of the local knucleheads (We called him Big Lip Louie). He went to bond court and was release on his own recognizance,but had to walk back from court. On the way he stopped at a pay phone to call the station and anonymously threatened the arresting officer by name. Louie thought he was being slick calling from the pay phone and then hanging up. The trouble was the operator was listening and she cut in after he’d hung up and gave us the location of the payphone. It was a simple matter of swooping down and checking the area. The incoming calls were all recorded on our end, and Louie had a distinctive voice. We grabbed him and took him back to jail. Best of luck with your new book. It sounds like a real winner.

    Reply
    • Valerie Brooks

      Whoops, something happened and my reply didn’t go through. Let’s try this again.
      Michael,
      Well, they never said small-time criminals were smart. I love the name Big Lip Louie. I’m assuming he had a big lip or was lippy?
      You must have a wealth of stories to tell!
      Thanks for your well wishes!
      Valerie

      Reply
    • Donnell

      Sounds like Mike as nd Valerie dhould co-write a story:)

      Reply
  7. Victoria Weisfeld

    What an interesting launch to your career! If FBI agents had shown up at my front door–even if my mother had called them–I’m sure I would have fainted. Then picked myself up and been mightily curious about what they’d do next. Best of luck with the new book.

    Reply
    • Valerie Brooks

      Hi Victoria!
      The odd thing was I didn’t know my dad had called the FBI. As I knew nothing about whom to report it to, that was a surprise although he did say he’d take care of it.
      What was surprising to me was these FBI agents seemed so “normal” and not of the super hunky variety. But. hey, I was 16!
      Thank you for the best wishes!
      Valerie

      Reply
      • Valerie Brooks

        I still don’t know who actually called the FBI–Mom or Dad. I suspect my Mom as I wrote in the story. But it was a long time ago.
        Recently while at Bouchercon, I told this story when I was on a panel about getting details right. A man in the audience suggested I go through the Freedom of Information process to get the details.
        As a writer, I am curious. But I don’t know yet if I will or not.

        Reply
  8. Marilyn Meredith

    Great post. I was a phone operator once–eaons ago–long distance and sometimes Information. Believe me, we all listened into celebrities conversations,even the supervisors, never anything exciting though. It was a dfferent time. As an information operator we could answer any questions if we knew the answer even how to cook something. What was the weather like? We looked out the window. Whenever I needed a job back then, I became a phone operator.

    Reply
    • Valerie Brooks

      Hi Marilyn,
      Yes, we did listen in, but not very often as we were watched carefully. Although we had celebrities in the area who vacation in the Lakes Region, they didn’t use phone booths. LOL. But those were the days that people made person-to-person calls, collect calls, and some others I can’t remember, and those could be interesting.
      But, wait, I wasn’t supposed to be listening in. Ah, at least you could look out the window. Ours was like a basement. Just artificial light as I recall. And as a 16-year-old, it was boring! Plus, we were given split shifts which really interfered with our social life.
      Thanks for sharing your phone operator experience!
      Valerie

      Reply
  9. Elizabeth Varadan

    Wow that sounds so chilling to have heard a “hit” being planned over the phone. I’m so glad your mom thought of calling the FBI. I haven’t read your books yet but now I want to. (A wonderful aspect of blogs is making discoveries like this.)

    Reply

Submit a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

PATTI PETRONE MILLER – Prolific Multi-Genre Writer

Patti is the co-executive producer for a television series in pre-production titled THUMBS UP! about a boy with Autism and his special dog with opposable thumbs. She is the author of over seventy-five books and over two hundred fifty works in progress. Patti is the very first author to be chosen as a judge for the PBS KIDS GO contest to present the awards as well. She has been an educator, an agent, and an editor. Currently, she sits at home writing in pajamas in Las Vegas, NV, with her three world domination dogs.

England’s most famous witch trial took place in Lancashire in 1612. Ten of the so-called Pendle Witches were hanged at Lancaster Castle after being deemed guilty of witchcraft. Their ghosts reputedly haunt the village of Newchurch, where one of the witches is said to be buried.

Gwen Winter and her two brothers, Lance and Merle, travel to England with their Father to visit their Aunt. Gwen knows what she wants to see and do while there. She is determined to solve a mystery centuries-long, to search for clues of what happened to the sisters Pendle and why they had been accused.

Gwen finds out she has been carrying a family secret that will haunt her for the rest of her life. Will she be able to deal with the new found information long enough to solve the mystery, or will she fall into the deep dark folds of the family secret?

Find out in this first installment of the Ghost Tales Mystery Series, The Pendleton Witches.

Do you write in more than one genre? Actually yes! I write in cozy mystery, thriller, horror, MG, YA, Steampunk, Gaslamp, romance, rom-com, paranormal, fantasy, and many sub-genres

What brought you to writing? I have always dabbled in writing ever since I was a kid. I read a great deal also. My writing inspiration began when I started writing skits for plays when I was young. We used to put on a play once a week for the neighborhood kids and charge them five cents to watch. From there, I went on to work part-time for a newspaper, and the rest is history.

Where do you write? What, if any, distractions do you allow? I have an in-home office. I always write with some kind of background noise. If I get a phone call or someone pops in via social media, I sometimes welcome the distraction.

Tell us about your writing process: Hmm. I don’t have a process per se; I write when the bug bites. I normally try to write something every day after I sit down and check through email, have coffee, spend time with my pups or sit outside, depending on the weather. My writing time is usually done during the morning hours and falls into the afternoon.

What is the most challenging part of your writing process? Motivation! I’m a HUGE procrastinator! And writer’s block.

What are you currently working on? I have several books I’m currently working on at the moment. Cozy, primarily paranormal.

Has an association membership helped you with your writing? Tremendously! Years ago, I joined RWA and the local chapter in the state I was living in at the time. Back then, we were one of the largest with the most published authors. I learned a great deal from them over the years I was a member. I highly suggest to any writer to join as many as you can find.

Who’s your favorite author? Diana Gabaldon. She penned the Outlander series.

How long did it take you to write your first book? Eight months was A LOT of trial and error.

How long to get it published? One year with a traditional publisher back in 1989

We hear of strong-willed characters. Do yours behave or run wild? Oh dear lord! Mine are always running amok in my brain!

Do you outline, or are you a pantser? I used to be a pantser, but now I’ve finally learned, after 43 years, to outline and plot!

What is the best book you have ever read? G WELLS WAR OF THE WORLDS! I was thirteen years old and used to run home from school just to read all 600 pages of it!

Looking to the future, what’s in store for you? Completing our television show, having many books on the best sellers list and published with two of my bucket list publishers.

                                                   

Do you have any advice for new writers? Yes! STUDY the craft. Anyone can write a book…it takes great skill to write a GREAT one. Do your homework!

Anything else you’d like to tell us about yourself and your books? Our books are for everyone. We write books for children as young as two years old through adult. Our books are clean reads so every age can enjoy them. I write spooky, so anyone who reads RL Stine, Stephen King, and Dean Koonz will enjoy my books. I also write outside that box, so there are books for everyone.

How do our readers contact you? https://www.facebook.com/pattipetronemiller

1 Comment

  1. Michael A, Black

    Wow, Patti, you certainly have written in numerous genres. Your writing process sounds fascinating and ingenious. Best of luck to you.

    Reply

Submit a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

DARLENE DZIOMBA –

I’m Darlene Dziomba. I’ve been working in Fiscal Operations and Financial Planning for the University of Pennsylvania for over thirty years. I’m an animal lover. My parents always joked that from the time I learned to walk, I could not pass a dog without wanting to pet it.

 

Pre COVID, I volunteered at the Animal Welfare Association, a local New Jersey animal shelter. I hope to return to it when the virus dissipates. I miss the staff and the dogs. I had an idea for a book where the amateur sleuth worked at an animal shelter, and the Lily Dreyfus series was born. I have one dog, Billie, an irresistible terrier mix I adopted from AWA.

I had an idea for a book where the amateur sleuth worked at an animal shelter, and the Lily Dreyfus series was born. I have one dog, Billie, an irresistible terrier mix I adopted from AWA.

Clues From The Canines – Lily, an Adoption Coordinator at Forever Friends animal shelter, learns her boyfriend is dead via a dog surrender. Her pack rallies to sniff out the killer.

What brought you to writing? I was in Toronto, attending Bouchercon, and listening to a panel of writers who all had protagonists in animal-related professions. I thought to myself, “I’ve never read a book with an animal shelter employee as the protagonist. I wonder if I could write that?”

I had never attempted to write a book and had a lot to learn. I joined a Writers Workshop, took numerous online classes, and found a coach to assist me. I’m proud of myself for having brought this idea to fruition.

What is the most challenging part of your writing process? I work a full-time job besides my writing job. It is challenging to manage writing, editing, revising, maintaining a blog, maintaining a social media presence, promotions, getting enough sleep, exercising, and long walks with Billie.

Has an association membership helped you or your writing? Yes. I am a member of Sisters in Crime, the Guppies, and two regional SinC groups, SinC Fl Gulf Coast and SinC Grand Canyon Writers.

I am extremely grateful for the internet and Zoom. I’ve attended informative talks, taken craft classes, built a network, and found professional service providers.

How long did it take you to write your first book? How long to get it published? It took two and half years to have a fully written, well-crafted book. I queried agents for two years without much success. I was reluctant to self-publish because I knew an agent would be able to advise me and help me achieve the most success.

The pandemic influenced my decision to self-publish. More than anything else, I wanted my parents to be able to hold a book in their hands with my name on the cover. They are in their eighties, so I didn’t feel I could wait however many years it would take to find the agent and publisher willing to accept my work and decided to self-publish.

From start to finish, it took four and a half years to bring Clues From the Canines to fruition.

Do you base any of your characters on real people? Most of my characters are based on real people. My protagonist is not. Friends ask if Lily represents me and seem surprised when I say no.

The character of Martin is based on the person who was my supervisor at the animal shelter. He was quite the character, and we engaged in a lot of pithy exchanges. Ironically, I had to tone down Martin’s personality. He offended every single beta reader.

I had one friend point blank ask for a character. She plays a major role in the sequel Up Close And Pawsonal.

Do you outline, or are you a pantser? I am not sure “outline” adequately describes what I do. There are psychologists who would love to study my need for the obsessive detail of my plotting template.

I took a course called “Plot Thickeners” with Simon Wood. He showed me a phenomenal plotting method. Then I added to it.

Looking to the future, what’s in store for you? Once the world has conquered COVID, I hope to travel again, and eventually, I will retire from my day job and write full time.

As far as writing, I will keep producing Lily Dreyfus books as long as I can continue to come up with creative plots. For now, getting the first book launched is so exciting. I am basking in being proud of this accomplishment.

Do you have any advice for new writers? Be open-minded. My coach likes to say that she enjoys working with me, “Because you’re smart enough to realize that you need help.” It was important for the process to have beta readers who would be critical and push me to make the book better. One doesn’t need to change their base story, but new writers should toy with the ideas that are offered to them and see if they would enhance the story.

How do our readers contact you?

www.ReadDarlene.com

@ReadDarlene1

facebook.com/read.darlene.7

ReadDarlene@hotmail.com

https://www.amazon.com/s?k=clues+from+the+canines

Thank you very much for hosting me today.

 

4 Comments

  1. Marina Teramond @ NMPL

    Honestly, I am inspired by such people as Darlene Dziomba because they are a real example of true dedication to the business and they make such a valuable contribution to the people’s lives. It is so wonderful that Darlene Dziomba volunteered at the Animal Welfare Association because, for me, volunteers are a real manifestation of altruism. This book has an absolutely unique original concept because before this moment I hadn’t seen a book with such a plot and idea. Of course, it is really difficult to cope with such different tasks simultaneously and perform everything perfectly, but I admire Darlene Dziomba because not every person can multitask. I think that it disciplines you and helps you avoid procrastination. It is incredible when you base your characters on real people because it makes them more realistic and helps many people to find similar personality traits in them.

    Reply
  2. Michael A. Black

    Having an animal in a book is always a plus for me. Bless you for caring about animals and doing so much for them. You sound like a wonderful person. Good luck with your writing.

    Reply
  3. Mary Hirsig Hagen

    I love animal stories and enjoyed your comments and your idea for your books. Best of luck.

    Reply
  4. Nancy Nau Sullivan

    Darlene, So good to see you here. Congrats on Clues from the Canines–and for using your background and love of animals to develop the book. Nancy Nau Sullivan

    Reply

Submit a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

JENNIFER J. CHOW -Lefty Award Nominated Author

Jennifer J. Chow is the Lefty Award-nominated author of the Sassy Cat Mysteries and the forthcoming L.A. Night Market Mysteries. The first in the Sassy Cat series, Mimi Lee Gets A Clue, was selected as an OverDrive Recommended Read, a PopSugar Best Summer Beach Read, and one of BuzzFeed’s Top 5 Books by AAPI authors. She currently serves as Vice President on the national board of Sisters in Crime. She is an active member of Crime Writers of Color and Mystery Writers of America.

One of BookRiot’s Best Upcoming Cozy Mysteries for the Second Half of 2021!

When murder follows Mimi Lee to her romantic island getaway, she puts on her best sleuthing hat with her sassy cat in tow in this adventurous cozy mystery by Jennifer J. Chow.

“Chow offers original characters, clever banter, and a laid-back California vibe. This is perfect for lovers of crime-solving animal cozies.”—Publishers Weekly

Mimi Lee Cracks the Code is the third book in the Sassy Cat Mystery series and just got nominated for a 2022 Lefty Award for Best Humorous Mystery!

Do you write in more than one genre? I’ve most recently written cozy mysteries but have also dabbled in multicultural women’s fiction and young adult. You can find out more about all my books on my author website listed below.

What brought you to writing? The love of the written word. I got transported by stories at an early age and always enjoyed living in my own imaginary world. It was beautiful when I realized that you could write for a living and share that joy and wonder with others.

 What are you currently working on? I’m working on a new cozy mystery series, the L.A. Night Market Mysteries, which feature opposite-personality cousins who run a food stall. When one of their customers dies at a local night market, they get served a side of murder and start investigating. The first in the series is called Death by Bubble Tea and is available for pre-order!

Has an association membership helped you or your writing? Yes, definitely! I’m biased because I now serve as Vice President on the national board of Sisters in Crime, but I really appreciate the camaraderie and community there. Writing is a solitary profession, and it’s so important to get support from those who understand what it’s like. The encouragement and cheering from other writers also helps you keep persevering when you go through rejections and low points in your writing journey.

How long to get it published? My first novel took me about five years to get published, if you include missteps and shelved manuscripts. Mimi Lee Cracks the Code was part of a three-book deal I got with Berkley/Penguin Random House. The first book in the series, Mimi Lee Gets A Clue, happened to be a quick acquisition because the imprint was already looking for a pet-themed cozy series with an Asian American female lead. It took only several months from providing them with sample chapters to getting the official contract!

How can our readers buy your book and contact you?

Mimi Lee Cracks the Code buy link: https://www.penguinrandomhouse.com/books/605898/mimi-lee-cracks-the-code-by-jennifer-j-chow/9781984805034/

Author website: www.jenniferjchow.com

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/JenJChow

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/jenjchow/

Twitter: https://twitter.com/JenJChow

 

10 Comments

  1. DONNARAE MENARD

    Sounding good Jennifer. And having 17 cats in my last book, I can’t wait for yours!

    Reply
  2. Mary Hirsig Hagen

    Thanks for the interesting blog I love stories with animals and will check out your book.

    Reply
  3. Donnell Ann Bell

    Very interesting! Your books sound so fun. Will check them out. Thanks George for cheering on your fellow writers!

    Reply
    • Jennifer J. Chow

      Thanks for stopping by, Donnell! Agree that George is so supportive!

      Reply
  4. Michael A. Black

    A cozy mystery and a cat–Sounds like a great combination. My own cat mystery story, “Six Toed Ollie,” is set to be republished in an upcoming anthology. I’ll have to check your books out. Best of luck to you, Ms. Chow.

    Reply
    • Jennifer J. Chow

      Thanks, Michael! Congrats on your story getting republished in a new anthology!

      Reply

Submit a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

VERA CHAN – Reporter – Editor – Author

Vera Chan, Murderers’ Feast in Midnight Hour: A Chilling Anthology of Crime Fiction by 20 Authors of Color, edited by Abby L. Vandiver

Vera Chan has likely published a million words — most of them true. The former reporter and editor marks her fiction debut with Murderers’ Feast in the Midnight Hour anthology edited by Abby Vandiver. A UC Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism alum, she has worked at daily newspapers and the world’s biggest online destinations covering everything from lifestyle and entertainment to news features and search trends. Her mystery-in-progress Following won her the Sisters in Crime’s Eleanor Taylor Bland award. Her unpublished humor novel The Mounted Position garnered second place for fiction at the inaugural Effie Lee Morris Women’s National Book Association Literary Awards, San Francisco Chapter. Both manuscripts are out on submission through the Jennifer De Chiara Literary Agency. Her day job is as senior manager, worldwide journalism relations at Microsoft.

“Men had been murdered for less. And yet John Manley still lived. Five days, surrounded by false friends and his truest enemies. Every last one of them, cowards.

My short story Murderers’ Feast is what I call corporate noir. It’s dark yet tongue-in-cheek, about an insufferable gazillionaire throwing a five-day retreat with people he has screwed over. The story even includes kombucha (which runs freely in some corporate cafeterias) as a deadly weapon.

Like many journalists, I’ve always wanted to write fiction. As a kid, I devoured books, gravitating to British classics like Martin Pippin in the Apple Orchard, Jane Eyre, Wuthering Heights, Pride and Prejudice, Rebecca. Mystery has always been a favorite genre, and there too, British authors dominated childhood favorites (e.g., Agatha Christie, G.K. Chesterton, Dorothy Sayers, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle). That said, nothing tops Rex Stout’s Nero Wolfe & Archie Goodwin canon. I’ve even sought out radio plays and various screen interpretations. Sadly, nothing has captured the series’ trenchant charm (imagine a young Robert Downey Jr. as Goodwin). I’ll refrain from ranting about how Hollywood grievously lags behind the Brits in honoring its mystery classics with a cinematic treatment and charismatic casting.

Having my fiction debut alongside the works by established authors is miraculous. I joined Crime Writers of Color (CWOC), an association founded by award-winning authors Kellye Garrett, Gigi Pandian, and the legendary Walter Mosley. What’s brilliant is how the group embraces not just published authors but also emerging writers, which makes a huge difference in trying to navigate an already challenging field. Abby Vandiver proposed an anthology in a Groups.IO thread, and Midnight Hour came together in stunning speed — during a pandemic. The miracle is how nobody questioned having a newbie in the mix: I keep waiting for someone to say, “How the hell did this one sneak in?” So far, I haven’t been found out.

I must confess, while I’m giddy about being part of a groundbreaking anthology, the kicker for me is that Midnight Hour will be at Target! I shop locally when I can and boycott chains that don’t compensate employees fairly. I’ve revered Target for many reasons, among them as a place that made high design accessible to plebes, even with something as prosaic as a broom.

Getting into publishing hasn’t been easy: I often joke, grimly, that I’m trying to break into an industry even more challenging than journalism. (I use a more colorful term than “challenging.”) Finding my spectacular agent took years; now, she suffers on my behalf in the excruciating pace of submissions, made worse by the pandemic. My decision to go “traditional” rather than self-publish lies partly in my “traditional” journalism route and because of my parents. My father was trained as a chemist and my mother an English teacher: When they escaped the Cultural Revolution to the United States, they ran their own mercantile and restaurant businesses. Witnessing their sacrifices made me leery to pursue an entrepreneurial route. Plus, reasonable or not, I feel writing is a wonderful indulgence and a privilege that I can justify by making it part of a larger business.

As for those stories on submission: The Mounted Position is about shy hapless tech writer Abba Welles-Lee who, despite being practiced in the arts of evading intimacy, finds herself dragooned into the bruising yet comical world of martial arts. (The title refers to a mat wrestling maneuver.) Finding an agent took so long, I wrote Following, which centers around amateur private eye Brenna Hom, tasked with spying on the wayward children of moneyed Asian parents during the most accelerated pace of digital communication innovation in the history of the world.

 I’ve been so restless about those books making the rounds that I’m writing a third — a mystery satire about a series of deaths accompanied by messages written in excruciating business jargon.

As you might guess, work is the pattern, which may explain why I also like police procedurals. Indeed, this draft could be pitched as Janet Evanovich meets Ed McBain.

The other commonality is martial arts: Watching (too) many kung fu movies with stellar fighting women has made me impatient with stories featuring insipid females. And yes, those Hong Kong action films inspired me to take martial arts, where I met my husband. I’m not great, but I’m still at it after 35 years and volunteer-teach at Cal.

Because whether it’s work, play, or getting published, it’s about putting up the good fight. Thanks, George, for letting me get a couple of rounds in your marvelous blog.

This link will take you to my website: http://verahcchan.com/

This link will take you to all the outlets where you will find Midnight Hour: https://www.penguinrandomhouse.com/books/673674/midnight-hour-by-abby-l-vandiver/

7 Comments

  1. John G. Bluck

    I believe you’ve taken the right path to be traditionally published, though it is difficult to do it. There are so many new books each year, and there are so few large publishing companies. Those firms dominate much of the book market.
    Having worked in journalism, I agree it’s much harder to break into book publishing (fiction especially) than it is to be a successful journalist. To be a good reporter, you need to dig out the facts and report them accurately, often avoiding adjectives. To write fiction, you must invent or adapt facts. You need to fashion believable, flawed characters.
    I look forward to “Murderers’ Feast” in the “Midnight Hour” anthology. Frankly, I sometimes wonder why there seems to be less interest in short story volumes in the publishing industry than in novels. I would think readers would enjoy reading shorter pieces in this fast-paced world, which speeds up more and more as time goes on.

    Reply
  2. Deven Greene

    Murderer’s Feast sounds like a great read. Love the idea of corporate noir – w tongue-in- cheek to boot!

    Reply
  3. Heidi Noroozy

    Thanks for sharing your writing journey, Vera. I’ll look forward to reading your story in the anthology.

    Reply
  4. Susan Alice Bickford

    Really fun reading this. I’ll be looking for the anthology.

    Reply
  5. Stella Oni

    I love this candid piece on your writing journey. So happy to be part of Midnight Hour too.

    Reply
  6. Michael A. Black

    Congratulations on your story being in the anthology. That’s always a great feeling, especially if it’s your first one. Best of luck to you.

    Reply

Submit a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *