Tag Archives: US 101

Rounding the Corner and Heading for Home

Rounding the corner and heading for home always brings a change in attitude. Much like the first day of a ride, you want to put on the miles. Our first day on this adventure we rode 440 miles, today I rode 432.

Jim and I agreed to ride about half way home and spend the night. Once we hit Redding, California, we knew we were headed home.

The weather was iffy leaving Crescent City but we decided against the heavy stuff.

P1030960

We made it about forty miles before we had to stop for bridge construction. It was warming up and it looked like it would be a long stop so I took off my jacket and stowed my sweatshirt. I took a couple of shots of Jim stretching before putting my jacket back on. The camera fell out of my jacket pocket, hit the ground, and broke. There is nothing visible but the viewer remains black. It will record an image but you have no idea what you are shooting.

We saw warning signs for Elk. Rounding a gentle curve, I saw a white van stopped in the roadway. Jim braked, and just before he stopped, the van moved away. Wondering what had caused the stop, I scanned both sides of US 101. Grazing in the front yard of a ranger station were at least a dozen Elk.

Later, coming into McKinleyville I saw at least forty Elk peacefully munching a farmer’s alfalfa crop.

The following picture of the California Coast line was taken blind.

Patricks Point
At Arcata, we turned east on California 299. 299 is a great ride and we have crossed it several times during Brown Water Runs.

I first crossed 299 more than fifty years ago. A freshman at Humboldt State College, I had relatives in Redding. So one Saturday morning I put out my thumb and away I went. Back then 299 was a true adventure, more like a corkscrew that a highway. I think the speed limit was 35 MPH. There were not a lot of warning signs. I got a ride on a loaded logging truck. It was an experience that I would not like to repeat.

About a month later, three fellow students and I decided to go to a dance at Chico State College. One of the guys had a cousin who was a student there. According to MapQuest it’s about 210 miles from Arcata to Chico. I know it was further back in 1962. It took us twelve hours each way. With the bald tires on my old Ford we slid across a few curves and off the road once or twice.

We slept on the floor at a Sorority house and had a ball at the dance. Chubby Checker was reigning supreme at the time. The only thing I remember clearly was doing the Twist.

Cal-Trans is still straightening out 299. We got stuck at a realignment project.

On 299

We passed a couple of cars on the right and pulled under a tree at the side of the road. The shade made it bearable. The picture was taken with my iPhone.

Once in Redding we fueled up and headed home. I-5 from Redding south can be best described as miserable and hot. I wasn’t disappointed.

Our next outing is only two weeks away. July 5th is the beginning of the 2013 Brown Water Run. We have over twenty riders confirmed.

Jim and I are already forecasting a ride for 2014. The plan is to ship the Harleys to Halifax, Nova Scotia. We’ll fly there and ride down the coast to New Orleans and ship the bikes home. The route is about 3,200 miles. But we never take the direct route. With Jim leading the way, we should cover at least 4,000 miles.

Key Largo

Jim has never been to Key West, Florida, and I am always up for a bit of scuba diving at John Pennekamp Coral Reef State Park, Key Largo. With any luck the Phantom will be well enough to join us, and maybe even a few other hardy souls.

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Chance of Rain – Beware of Old Wives’ Tales

Red sky at night; sailors delight,
Red sky in the morning; sailors warning

Last night produced a beautiful red filled sunset. This morning the sky was grey so we couldn’t see the color. The various weather reports reported “possibility of rain.”

It was chilly so we wore sweatshirts and jackets. Twenty miles down the road it began to rain. Not heavy, but steady. We started looking for a sheltered place to change into our foul weather gear. The rain lightened up to a drizzle and we made it to the next town where we stopped to warm up and get coffee.

1 Changing to rain gear

We changed under an overhang at a historical site.

2 - Lewis and Clark Park above Astoria

This was in the Lewis and Clark National Forest on US 101 about twenty miles north of Astoria, Oregon.

3 Crossing from WA to OR

We were still enjoying the rain when we crossed the Columbia River on the Astoria-Megler Bridge from Washington into Astoria, Oregon. The bridge is unique in two areas. First, it is the longest continuous truss bridge in North America. The four mile plus bridge was the last segment of US 101. Once completed, it connected Los Angeles, California with Olympia, Washington in August 1966.

4 Astoria Bridge

The rain followed us all day. As usual it abated when we stopped for the evening.

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US 101 Runs North to South – Not Always

1 101 West
June 18, 2013

US 101 runs from Tumwater, Washington to the East Los Angeles Interchange, the world’s busiest. The stretch that loops the Olympic Peninsula has West and East across the top of the peninsula. Over the years, I ridden or driven over the almost 2,500 miles of US 101.

A route that Jim and I’ve covered from beginning to end is Washington 20. It begins in Newport at the Idaho border and ends on the Olympic Peninsula. You’ve seen some wonderful photographs taken along WA 20.

We began the day’s journey at Oak Harbor, Washington. After a nippy ride to the Port Townsend-Keystone Ferry and a short wait, we were the first motor vehicles to board the ferry.

2 On the Ferry Waiting

The last time we rode one of the Washington State Ferries, our Harleys were strapped to the side of the cargo area. We expected the same, but were pleasantly surprised when we pulled to the front (or rear) of the vessel. We parked the bikes on the kick stands. It was a smooth ride across to Port Townsend.

We stopped in Port Angeles for lunch and to change into our foul weather gear. It rained off and on until late afternoon.

3 Scenery

This was taken at a wide spot in the road. It stopped raining long enough for me to get the shot.

4 Sunset

We enjoyed a sunset that lasted more than twenty minutes.

Old Adage:

Red sky at night; sailors delight,
Red sky in the morning; sailors warning

In Matthew XVI: 2-3, Jesus said, “When in evening, ye say, it will be fair weather: For the sky is red. And in the morning, it will be foul weather today; for the sky is red and lowering.”

Old adages and biblical quotes don’t always foretell reality. We had plenty of rain the next day.

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